I am NOT a “Book Guy”

Contrary to popular perception, I’m not a book guy.

A post shared by Eric Case (@ecase68) on

Honestly.

<glancing nervously>

No, really I’m not…

… I don’t have a problem.

Okay, let me defend myself. I’m not a book guy; I’m an idea guy.

I’d actually like to think that I’m a growth guy.

I’m hungry for growth—maybe desperately hungry—and to my mind there are two ways to grow.

The first way is organic and incremental. “Slow and steady wins the race.” You get up and do the same things repeatedly, in order to feed yourself and feel yourself (though actually you don’t always perceive it) steadily growing and changing.

(I am lousy at this.)

Don’t get me wrong: I try. I have disciplines in my life, and I do my best to establish healthy rhythms and practices of grace and growth. But it is a consistent struggle.

The second way to grow is punctuated, evolutionary. It can occur when something—an idea or thought—enters a system that forces that system to change.

  • a thought
  • a concept
  • a belief
  • an action

Sometimes, we can look for experiences to introduce variables: concerts, art galleries & installations, conferences, etc.

But sometimes funds and time prohibit these experiences. In this case, we can turn to shorter-term, less demanding “variables”, like movies (documentaries, please), television shows…

… and books.

Books are not the point. Growth is.

If I recommend—or give—a book to you, I don’t want you to read it. 

I want you to grow.

What about you? How do you introduce new “variables” into the system of your life? When is the last time you allowed yourself to experience something new in order to grow?

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4 thoughts on “I am NOT a “Book Guy”

  1. I resonate with this 100%. I’m an ideas guy, so the best books (for me) are ones that challenge my thinking or put forward a novel approach to something. Podcasts are good, and Sunday morning sermons as well. I seem to do my best thinking while listening to someone else teach. But the best variables come from being present and aware in the ordinary, in everyday life.

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